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Fashion-Blogger-Burnout

Fashion PR: Fashion Blogger Burnout?

I've heard rumblings of fashion blogger backlash, appreciated even, the satirical attempts to poke fun at the poses, the affected speech, the same pair of wedges running standard.  Despite this, I've spent several years educating major fashion brands on the value of developing partnerships with bloggers, jumping up and down (metaphorically, of course) until blue in the face about the value of working with style bloggers, of involving them in brand decisions, working with them to help boost social media credibility and drive interest and awareness. I continue to feel compelled to shine the light on brands who are working with bloggers in new and innovative ways and am a huge proponent of listening and taking in feedback from customers and digital influencers.

And then it happened. It's late at night and I am scrolling through my "shop spam." I click through a particularly potent offer on a GAP email and there's Susie Bubble. Susie Bubble for the Gap? And the rabid online shopper part of me and the social media marketer in me emitted one big collective sigh. We might have even emitted the slightest of eye-rolls. And this is coming from someone who loves loves loves her some fashion bloggers.

This is certainly not directed at Susie, or even at the Gap. I want fashion bloggers to be able to make a career out consulting or writing and contributing their creativity. I want brands to evolve past the email pitch, the trunk show invite and work with people all over the world who are truly passionate about the industry, about clothing, about community. I love the fact that there are bloggers who are working with (or without) agents to negotiate incredible opportunities, finding real legitimacy in the fashion world, the quest or rejection from which often inspired their desire to blog in the first place.

And yet...

My nose is crinkling with a whiff of impending 'fashion blogger plus fashion brand' overkill.  And, I'm frustrated that there are only a handful of bloggers - a fashion blogger brat pack - if you will, that seem to be in the running for the best gigs. Brands are just going for the obvious choices, both in terms of the talent they choose and how they decide to work with them. Two years ago it was a risk to put a huge image of a fashion blogger in your store, now its perfunctory.

So in my late night delirium, I'm calling for fashion brands, and by extension their PR departments to take a step back. Think about your long-term strategy, brand perception and promise. Consider, for example, that in another six months, the fashion consumer might find her eyes glazing over and shrug her shoulders at your latest blogger-inspired campaign and if so, what's next? We've hit mainstream (it's just a matter of time before the quintessential top 10 makes it onto the cover of a major glossy) and working with fashion bloggers, while important and powerful, is no longer innovative,  no longer cause for self-congratulations, or god forbid, evidence of "social media savvy."

May we please consider:

  • Expanding and diversifying the bloggers in our selection set
  • Engaging bloggers beyond including their faces and bodies in our ad campaigns, or enticing them/their readership through product give-aways
  • What fashion blogger burnout might look like, how to watch for it, how help avoid it
  • Do we risk drowning out/diluting the very voices we once welcomed by surrounding our style blogger partners  with too much big brand agenda?
  • How do we evolve our understanding of influence, rather than revert or convert?

I'm tired of seeing the same handful of faces. And while I'm venting (!), it's not that much of a stretch to put a girl who looks like a model but who is not a model in the spotlight and then attempt to pull the "real women, real bodies" PR angle. Yuck. I'm afraid that successful fashion bloggers are being homogenized to fit the old tired industry expectations. Sure, you can be a bit quirky - but only in the right ways -  an edgy hair cut, freckles and a "curvy" size eight thrown in for good measure, but as brands and industries that work with brands to propel them forward,  we have a responsibility to consider what and whose points of view get the mass brand stamp of approval. Part of the power of fashion blogging for me is the way it invigorated an industry raise the curtain and examine and reflect on how clothing is being styled, worn, analyzed and experienced by all sorts of different kinds of people. Are we sending a not so silent message that to be successful as a style blogger, you must fit this "model-lite" aesthetic, and ethics aside, is that message really going to drive loyalty long-term?

Consumers will take their cue from perceived brand endorsement. Let's consider the message behind the marketing, rather than following the herd. Let's figure out where we can take some risks, learn collectively what can be improved upon, uncover a few hidden gems, and have some fun exploring our opportunities and evolution.

Featured image courtesy of German Aleman Photography. Design courtesy of Yazmina Cabrera, Girl with a Banjo.

About the author: Crosby


Known as the "fashion publicist's most powerful accessory," (SD-UT) and the "West Coast 'It' girl of fashion PR," (YFS Magazine) Crosby Noricks is a brand strategist, author and founder of PR Couture. Crosby was included in the iMedia 25 Class of 2012 Internet Marketing Leaders and Innovators, and enjoys helping fashion and lifestyle brands connect with their audiences in meaningful and creative ways.

95 Comments

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 2:12 am | Permalink

    You raise some interesting points and sentiments that many of us have been mulling over, if not voicing.

    As a lingerie blogger and a consumer, I’m thrilled when brands and designers really seem to be listening to and even participating in discussions. I’m thrilled to have them consider and reconsider what they’ve been doing — even when they must voice the practical limitations of our most fervent wishes.

    But, also as a blogger and a consumer both, I am dismayed when blogging and social media in general is viewed as a way to seize the moment with manipulation. Most consumers sigh, roll their eyes. But many now even eschew the positive aspects of blogging and social networking with brands because jaded perceptions are only confirmed by such actions.

    This is only multiplied by the number of bloggers who have readily made themselves for sale. It’s not merely that they have sold out by participating in payola, featuring brands with deep pockets over indies and new designers whose pockets have been emptied into their lines; no, too many have forgotten why they began blogging in the first place, allowing their voices to be squelched in pursuit of the monetary gains of advertising, endorsement deals, etc.

    As an ethical blogger, I worry I too will be dismissed as “for sale” in such manner.

    I struggle to meet the needs of my readers, refusing paid posts and other payola, refusing to change or amend reviews to be more to the liking of the maker or PR person who sent the garment or review item, etc. –and I know many other bloggers in other niches, including non-fashion areas, who suffer with the same issues too. It’s not that it’s ethically difficult to do, but it is a huge time suck to address these issues, both in terms of emails/direct contact and the resulting marketing challenges to compete with the unethical bloggers who are supported via links, tweets, traffic etc. of the brands who have bought them.

    This is the sort of “burn out” I suffer from, and what I thought perhaps your post was about ;)

    What keeps most of us going is the hope that this too will quickly pass, that good designer and brands will take the high road — that they will listen, learn and engage; not manipulate. If they don’t, they will lose customers, diminish their brands, and suffer the consequences.

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:51 am | Permalink

      Wonderful insight into the day-to-day choices we all make to maintain (or not!) the integrity of our blogs. Thank you for sharing!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 6:27 am | Permalink

    Very well said. The same thoughts have been going about in my mind. While it’s great to follow the “chosen ones” it’s always so refreshing to find someone who is doing something very different (in terms of looks, poses and posts). In regards to fashion houses, I’m glad that they invite bloggers to contribute to their brands vision. But at what costs? What happens when blogging changes or the next thing comes around the bend?

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    I would say that this sort of thing was inevitable. Fashion is informed by celebrity culture and process of incorporating bloggers into the fashion sphere has very much been a process celebrification. Fashion always picks and chooses who the hot names of the moment are and the price of hotness is a rapid cooling process. I don’t know if its a risk so much as a reality.

    I just moved from Toronto to London UK. In Toronto I was somewhat of a minor public figure, at least in the mini-fashion scene there, and here I am nothing and nobody. In a weird way, its bringing me back to what I loved about blogging in the first place – choosing the things I want to post from my own personal life and interests rather than being fed a steady stream of events and freebies by PR. While hotness has its advantages, so does obscurity – and I imagine as a PR yourself, sometimes you might feel just as inclined to protect an “outsider” blogger as you would to connect them – am I right?

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:49 am | Permalink

      Celebrification – thank you for naming that. I’ve been running PR Couture from a city that does not feed its bloggers fancy or fun – I’d say hardly anyone knows who I am or what I do – even with the Blogger of the Year title…and it has probably helped and hindered site growth. I certainly try and bring new faces (and ideas) to the table, and do feel extremely protective of friends and those I admire.

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 7:01 am | Permalink

    Brava!!! Thank you!!! What happened to discovering “The Next” or “The New”? It appears that brands feel that they have discovered the magical solution to their internet campaigns! What they are forgetting is that our eyes get tired of the same old…….. Hey how about discovering “the New”, “the Next” blogger, or, even better, do what Sunglass Hut is doing with Full Time Fabulous and offer unknown bloggers a chance to be “the Next” with a 6 figure salary!!!

    all the best, Monica

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:50 am | Permalink

      Hi Monica, speaking of – did you catch the latest post by Jinna? She’s one of the finalists over at sunglass hut!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 7:22 am | Permalink

    thank you for writing this. i’ve long felt the same… since at least about a year ago. maybe that’s why it turned me off blogging so much and for a long time i deserted my own blog. because everywhere i was seeing the same people, who all look the same, dress the same, take the same photos. i was sick of it. save for my favourite authentic style bloggers, susie and queen michelle, as well as belle (fashion pirates), i just couldn’t take the rest of the blogging world. a couple of high profile bloggers whom i’ve met before disgusted me with their turn-on-turn-off attitude for when we are alone and when their “fans” come up and say hi. the snobbery, the astonishing way they diss their own readers, the sudden change in facial expressions… i just didn’t want to associate myself with this breed of new so-called style icons. plus, it’s sickening to look at blogs now and see everyone in the same clothes. there’s no real style in the new breed of bloggers. it’s not their own and you can tell. everyone’s either “dressing quirky” or in the same stupid alexander wang b.s.

    i grew annoyed with the blogging world and just had to put it aside for a while and concentrate on my real job as a designer and stylist. it’s a little sad, don’t you think? i have a new print magazine and although we’re so new, i’ve already had a couple of bloggers who’ve written to us asking if we would like to feature them and take their pictures; they could even model for us. i’d been an advocate for taking outfit pictures and have said things like, “don’t be afraid of who you are”, but seriously where did all this self-confidence come from??

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:46 am | Permalink

      Thanks for your honesty Gilda – I’m interested to learn more about your current projects!

      • Posted December 9, 2010 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

        i’ve been busy working on my own label, preparing for the next collection and getting ready for this huge trade show i’m taking part in next year. also there’s my print magazine, RightyRightyRight (http://RightyRightyRight.com), that i write and style editorials for, that takes up just as much time as designing. completely fulfilling though!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 8:18 am | Permalink

    Great post! Thank you so much for writing this, what I have been thinking for a while. It’s funny, when I started blogging five years ago, there were some of these “hot” bloggers on the scene, but they were so unique and fresh and inspiring with their fashion sense.

    Now, fashion bloggers are a dime a dozen and we keep seeing the same faces and names being promoted. It’s pretty boring, and it makes me think of the dot com era or MySpace – are we going to oversaturate the market to the point that fashion blogging become passe?

    Not to say I don’t love the idea of a “regular” person being the face for a brand – big props to Susie Bubble, she deserves her fame. However the bigger and bigger these fashion bloggers become, the less they are “regular” or even unique, and the more they are just more of the same – actresses, singers, models, all skinny chicks with crazy shoes and hunched shoulders who wear size 4 clothing.

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:45 am | Permalink

      That last line made me laugh out loud!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 8:29 am | Permalink

    amen, amen, amen crosby. you have said brilliantly and concisely what A LOT of us are thinking. i’ve also talked here and there about my frustration with the current crop of a-list bloggers (who i’d actually consider models rather than bloggers) – but i agree with danielle that it’s inevitable. it’ll shake out eventually, but it’s still disappointing.

  • Margaret
    Posted December 7, 2010 at 12:02 pm | Permalink

    Great article – you make some excellent points. Like Gilda, I became turned off about how the fashion blogging community is portrayed and had to break.

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 1:34 pm | Permalink

    Very well put and such an amazing read! Brava to you Crosby!!!!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 1:36 pm | Permalink

    “And, I’m frustrated that there are only a handful of bloggers – a fashion blogger brat pack – if you will, that seem to be in the running for the best gigs.”

    Agreed.

    xxx
    Duck

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

    Very interesting editorial! I’ve often wondered what the current crop of fashion bloggers will do “next.” There’s definitely a shelf life for any blogger and I hope these ladies can use their current exposure to propel them to the next thing. What that is I suppose time will only tell.

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    This is what needed to be said a long time ago, so I’m glad someone finally addressed this issue. But unfortunately, fashion blogging is no different to the fashion industry, it’s all about aesthetics and who is the most marketable. Personally I love reading fashion blogs (I have my own), it’s great to read someone else’s opinions and see their style. However recently, a lot of fashion bloggers want to be like the “it” girls (as I like to call them), so now you see dozens of “Mini Me’s” and no originality.

    Great article, let’s see if any of the big brands take notice of your wise words!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 2:06 pm | Permalink

    Bravo, this was absolutely inevitable, and I do hope the industry takes your insight into account. Not that our favourite bloggers don’t equally deserve their renown and attention (after all, we all started from the same square, didn’t we?), but we are starting to carve out an increasingly specific “blogger style” niche and those who don’t conform are starting to fall to the wayside. Ironic and sad, considering that blogs were once a place to which we looked for originality and flair.

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    Kudos.
    Well said.

    I’m 35 and, though they are cute to look at occasionally, am not as inspired by the tens of thousands of twenty-something girls wearing Urban Outfitters, as I am by bloggers near my own age, life experience & style. Coming across the latter is a challenge. Since brands/media only pick up the modcloth-ish younger ladies and Jane Aldridge, I have to really dig deep to find bloggers similar to myself. I’ve come across only a handful and two of them have stopped blogging.
    (If any style blogger closer to my age reads this, please come over and say hi and let me know your blog address!! thosetricks.com)

    Thanks for bringing this up, Crosby.

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:44 am | Permalink

      Thanks Stephanie! I have recently crossed the threshold into my third decade as well and crave the same content!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    Wow, I really feel like this post was one of the more honest and informative things I’ve read in a while. As someone who’s extremely new to the fashion blogging game, I can honestly say you took the words right out of my mouth. As a student I am constantly hearing from professors that we need to have blogs to distinguish ourselves from the herd, but its pretty darn impossible when only certain types of blogs get attention or only certain types of people’s blogs are deemed worthy of that attention.

    As someone who will never be a model ( nor do I ever want to ) does my blog even have a chance at recognition because I probably wouldn’t look the best on a billboard, runway, whatever…

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:43 am | Permalink

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts Lindsay – I believe having your own little spot online is a great tool – PR Couture has opened up so many professional opportunities – perhaps because I wasn’t really seeking recognition, it was more a format for me to tease out things I was interested in and have a bit of a voice. The support and community is a wonderful, humbling surprise.

      • Lbailey3
        Posted December 10, 2010 at 2:47 am | Permalink

        Thanks for replying Crosby! Good point about not seeking recognition, its the pleasure I get in writing and sharing that keeps me blogging away! Also, props to you for replying to to so many comments!! Your blog is such a great resource for young people interested in fashion PR!

  • Posted December 7, 2010 at 6:13 pm | Permalink

    Crosby,

    Terrific post. Eloquently voiced and on-point. As a social media executive who also loves fashion and is passionate about blogging, I’ve become increasingly annoyed and uninspired by the staid, ubiquitous faces who grasp at every shiny opportunity, not really considering how the churn and mass burn of partnerships and alliances only serves to devalue their equity and lower credibility. What makes my job harder is trying to counsel clients on more strategic alliances, a long-term blog strategy rather than participating in the noise.

    The missing link in all of this is the consumer. Are these alliances on-brand and inspiring/exciting for the end consumer? So many people focus on influencers, but lose the end-consumer connection. Do I respect Susie Bubble? Absolutely. However, as a Gap consumer, I’m more confused by, than connected to, the alliance.

    As a 34-year-old Coach consumer, do I care about seeing girls sporting knee-high socks and prancing about in miniskirts in sub-zero temps? No. Did the Coach Holiday video campaign inspire me? Absolutely not. True, there is a Poppy audience, however, when I think about Coach in social I immediately think of a missed opportunity to reach the classic Coach demo — the one who has grown with the heritage brand. What excites me about Coach is their infusion of chicness, their consistent quality — where are the social media consumer-centric campaigns that straddle this balance, this divergent audience? In the end, I connect Coach with young, hyper-stylish girls with whom I have no connection. Rather, I want to be inspired by women my age who are working executives seeking quality, timeless accessories.

    Perhaps that’s a long-winded way of saying that as a blogger, a marketer, and a consumer, I’m disappointed that our real women are only a slight deviation from the quote unquote unreal woman.

    And frankly, I’m bored.

    Cheers, Felicia

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:41 am | Permalink

      “As a Gap consumer, I’m more confused by, than connected to, the alliance” Nailed it!

      • Posted December 18, 2010 at 3:39 am | Permalink

        I think you both nailed it with the question pertaining to the consumer. Do mainstream audiences for Gap and Coach even know who these girls/guys are?

        • Posted December 18, 2010 at 7:58 pm | Permalink

          Now THAT is an excellent question for a consumer research study.

      • Posted December 18, 2010 at 3:39 am | Permalink

        I think you both nailed it with the question pertaining to the consumer. Do mainstream audiences for Gap and Coach even know who these girls/guys are?

  • Posted December 8, 2010 at 12:28 am | Permalink

    Crosby — Leave it up to you to tell it like it is :) It’s interesting to see how far bloggers have come. It seemed like just yesterday I was reading about bloggers being able to attend NY Fashion Week as “press”. Now we have bloggers all over the fashion glossies and ad campaigns.

    I have been seeing the same bloggers over and over again. I can’t really be mad at them for wanting fortune and fame. Who wouldn’t want to get paid for doing something they love? Remember that conversation we had when we first met and we talked about how it would be nice to make more money with our blogs?

    I do get what you’re saying, though. Companies really need to think about who their core customer is and connect with those bloggers who can 1) relate to that customer or 2) are truly passionate about their brand. I found it interesting that Susie would do an ad for Gap considering her style is more avant garde.

    It’s just a matter of time before companies will get it.

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:40 am | Permalink

      Absolutely! The inquiry came more as a call for consideration to brands rather than bloggers. It’s of course, interesting to see so many bloggers in support of the piece, and few thoughts from agencies or brands!

  • Posted December 8, 2010 at 9:11 am | Permalink

    I completely agree and think this was a great article. Although I love reading Susie Bubble I do not think she was a right fit for the Gap campaign. No one wants to see just another blogger, they want to see a blogger that has personal style that already that is an extension of the brand they are campaigning for. Susie Bubble has a very creative and unique style and in the campaign that seems totally played down. Her personal style does not really connect with the Gap customer where as I am sure there is a fashion blogger out there that credits Gap in her outfits all the time. That is really what they should be looking for.

    • Posted December 9, 2010 at 6:38 am | Permalink

      That’s a great point – I was confused by that particular partnership as well!

  • Posted December 8, 2010 at 4:37 pm | Permalink

    Hear, hear! When I hear a blogger is engaged in a fabulous opportunity I’m thrilled to bits for them, but come on! Let’s see some diversity! Now THAT’S interesting!

  • Posted December 8, 2010 at 7:30 pm | Permalink

    As a student I am constantly hearing from professors that we need to have blogs to distinguish ourselves from the herd, but its pretty darn impossible when only certain types of blogs get attention or only certain types of people’s blogs are deemed worthy of that attention.

  • Jinna
    Posted December 9, 2010 at 5:26 am | Permalink

    Preach, Crosby!

  • Posted December 9, 2010 at 5:33 am | Permalink

    Great writeup! Like any other marketing trend replayed more than one, this one is getting tired.

  • Posted December 10, 2010 at 7:03 pm | Permalink

    Love! This article. I think you said it perfectly, fashion bloggers are becoming conservative in the sense that i see no originality. Evolve!

    Erin @ http://www.thefashionset.com

  • Posted December 16, 2010 at 7:27 pm | Permalink

    excellent article!

  • Posted December 16, 2010 at 7:27 pm | Permalink

    excellent article!

  • Anonymous
    Posted December 17, 2010 at 1:45 am | Permalink

    AMAZING post and sooo truthful! I was waiting for someone to bring this up! I was shocked when I saw Susie in the GAP ad campaign. Not only was it random but it was unrelated. I thought she was an indie style blogger so I don’t understand why she’d even work with a brand as commercial as GAP. Also, I agree that there needs to be a long term plan for work with bloggers and also MORE DIVERSITY! There are no major African-American bloggers being recognized in the mainstream except for Karen from (Wheredidyougethatat).

    What about Claire from the Fashion Bomb, at least five posts a day spotlighting minority fashion, designers, and models, and it has 12 thousand Facebook fans! She works with companies but why isn’t she getting featured in campaigns?! And why are Style bloggers the only ones who get any press? I like Style blogs but the idea of taking pictures in your clothes & street style snaps needs to be laid to rest. What ever happened to *cough* writing? Just b/c we as bloggers don’t have degrees in fashion doesn’t mean we can’t write more than a paragraph in a post!

    And why all the re-posting of what everyone has already seen on WWD and Vogue? We’re still letting the magazines & big brands dictate us, what we do, and how we do it. Stand up and be different. After over 2.5 years as a music and now fashion blogger, I’ve finally reached the realization that yes, I want to make it and be recognized for my work but on my terms. I know that must sound awful but what I mean is that I’m not going to compromise myself for the almighty dollar, if the success comes great but at the end of the day, I have to stay true to myself and my readers. I always write at least 400 word posts and the writing is very personable and even more opinionated (as you can tell from this comment) but at the end of the day, you can tell that sweat, blood, tears, and soul goes into all of it. Sorry for the long comment but I needed to vent. Thanks for speaking the truth!

    • Posted December 18, 2010 at 7:58 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts! You definitely echo the thoughts of many~

    • Luv Ms.Lola
      Posted February 2, 2011 at 10:11 pm | Permalink

      amazingly written and very very well said!! i agree 100%

    • Posted March 15, 2011 at 6:51 pm | Permalink

      Loudpen,
      I couldn’t agree with you more, but from a slightly different angle! While I am a Fashion PR enthusiast, when it comes to blogging, I actually blog about food and fitness which puts me in the “healthy living blogger” genre. In our niche there also seems to be very little diversity and the same group of bloggers who get the majority of the opportunities. Marie Claire magazine even named them “the Big Six.” While I think some of their blogs are great and actually read them, if you visit each of their blogs, they are all exactly the same formula: 3 posts a day (one for each meal) of what they ate and a few tidbits from their day thrown in. There is nothing wrong with this formula, except that 99.9% of the healthy living blogs are now exact replicas of this, and those that aren’t, don’t seem to get as much recognition. As for diversity, it seems like the only HL blogs by African-American bloggers that get the recognition they deserve are those that are targeted specifically to African-American readers, which should not be the case. While I, of course face unique issues when it comes to food and fitness b/c of my race causing it to inevitably come up in a post from time to time (i.e., hair issues, traditional foods, etc.) it is not the platform of my blog, so when I recently received an email from a woman telling me how happy she was to see a healthy living blogger that “looked like her” it truly made my day…and at the same time made me realize how unfortunate it is that I received that email. :/ I’m really starting to think that this is an issue in blogger-relations all around no matter what genre you’re in.

      The bottom line is people will build the most positive feelings for (and ultimately brand loyalty to) what they see “themselves” in. I think this is something companies really need to take note of when working with bloggers.

  • BentleyBarks
    Posted December 17, 2010 at 5:49 pm | Permalink

    Love! Perfectly said.

  • WendyB
    Posted December 20, 2010 at 11:14 pm | Permalink

    Then there are those of us who are just 25 years too old to be fabulous! Sigh….

  • Posted December 22, 2010 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    Great article. I have been trying to work with bloggers on an amazing social initiative I started earlier this year called The Bloggers Soiree http://www.bloggerssoiree.com and I find it harder and harder to engage bloggers in my work because of the icon FX bloggers are leaving on brands. I am a blogger too but I do it strictly for passion but I would never consider myself as press or try to use my blogger status for brands to drool all over me because I got eyeballs. Usually its a one off deal. How about some consistency? Instead I use it for charity for bloggers to get out of this “give me give me give me and I’ll blog” about it stage to trying to use that social power for social good. It’s getting harder. I don’t think we really know the full potential of bloggers, there is a science behind it and I will be on the first team trying to research this phenomena. It’s more than just a brands toolbox…its a lifestyle that can be used more than whats it about.

  • Posted December 22, 2010 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    Great article. I have been trying to work with bloggers on an amazing social initiative I started earlier this year called The Bloggers Soiree http://www.bloggerssoiree.com and I find it harder and harder to engage bloggers in my work because of the icon FX bloggers are leaving on brands. I am a blogger too but I do it strictly for passion but I would never consider myself as press or try to use my blogger status for brands to drool all over me because I got eyeballs. Usually its a one off deal. How about some consistency? Instead I use it for charity for bloggers to get out of this “give me give me give me and I’ll blog” about it stage to trying to use that social power for social good. It’s getting harder. I don’t think we really know the full potential of bloggers, there is a science behind it and I will be on the first team trying to research this phenomena. It’s more than just a brands toolbox…its a lifestyle that can be used more than whats it about.

  • Posted January 24, 2011 at 12:52 am | Permalink

    Great article!!! I’m a fashion blog and its sometimes so discouraging when you see the same bloggers getting all the attention. I mean I love Rumi and her style but I feel like it’s so hard for us smaller “unknown” bloggers to get recognized.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know how I missed this gem of yours, Crosby. I’m feeling the same way, but not in a PR context…in a 35 y/o style blogging woman who wants to see beauty & fashion evolve beyond the glossies context. They’re starting to do online what they do offline. The view is too narrow & too predictable. Hating it. And, you make a great argument from a PR standpoint. The internet is moving fast & this isn’t going to work forever.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know how I missed this gem of yours, Crosby. I’m feeling the same way, but not in a PR context…in a 35 y/o style blogging woman who wants to see beauty & fashion evolve beyond the glossies context. They’re starting to do online what they do offline. The view is too narrow & too predictable. Hating it. And, you make a great argument from a PR standpoint. The internet is moving fast & this isn’t going to work forever.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know how I missed this gem of yours, Crosby. I’m feeling the same way, but not in a PR context…in a 35 y/o style blogging woman who wants to see beauty & fashion evolve beyond the glossies context. They’re starting to do online what they do offline. The view is too narrow & too predictable. Hating it. And, you make a great argument from a PR standpoint. The internet is moving fast & this isn’t going to work forever.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Crosby,
    This was a brilliantly written piece. I have read through all the comments and must say that Felicia Sullivan nailed it for me when she said “I want to be inspired by women my age who are working executives seeking quality, timeless accessories.” As an almost 50 “fashion blogger” who runs her own online magazine, I know I don’t fit into the fashion blogger brat pack. I hope that fact is what my readership and sponsors like about me.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Crosby,
    This was a brilliantly written piece. I have read through all the comments and must say that Felicia Sullivan nailed it for me when she said “I want to be inspired by women my age who are working executives seeking quality, timeless accessories.” As an almost 50 “fashion blogger” who runs her own online magazine, I know I don’t fit into the fashion blogger brat pack. I hope that fact is what my readership and sponsors like about me.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Crosby,
    This was a brilliantly written piece. I have read through all the comments and must say that Felicia Sullivan nailed it for me when she said “I want to be inspired by women my age who are working executives seeking quality, timeless accessories.” As an almost 50 “fashion blogger” who runs her own online magazine, I know I don’t fit into the fashion blogger brat pack. I hope that fact is what my readership and sponsors like about me.

  • Posted February 3, 2011 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Crosby,
    This was a brilliantly written piece. I have read through all the comments and must say that Felicia Sullivan nailed it for me when she said “I want to be inspired by women my age who are working executives seeking quality, timeless accessories.” As an almost 50 “fashion blogger” who runs her own online magazine, I know I don’t fit into the fashion blogger brat pack. I hope that fact is what my readership and sponsors like about me.

  • Anonymous
    Posted February 6, 2011 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

    This article sums of everything I’ve been thinking about fashion blogs for a very long time now. Eloquently written.
    I recently got stiffed by a huge corporation can’t say who exactly (for obvious reasons) and I have to think that It’s because I’m not sexy or cutesy looking. Whatever it is that makes a fashion blogger marketable I guess I just don’t have it. In a lot of ways this is good because now I can focus more on my writing and photography.

    glowingdoll.blogspot.com

  • Anonymous
    Posted February 6, 2011 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

    This article sums of everything I’ve been thinking about fashion blogs for a very long time now. Eloquently written.
    I recently got stiffed by a huge corporation can’t say who exactly (for obvious reasons) and I have to think that It’s because I’m not sexy or cutesy looking. Whatever it is that makes a fashion blogger marketable I guess I just don’t have it. In a lot of ways this is good because now I can focus more on my writing and photography.

    glowingdoll.blogspot.com

  • Sabine
    Posted February 10, 2011 at 7:09 pm | Permalink

    Great article! I noticed the same applies to the media. It’s like all journalists have a years-old list in their drawer they dig out when they need to mention/write about bloggers/the blogging world. The blogging world might have long moved on and there are lots of new interesting people aroung, but journalists can’t be bothered.

  • Anonymous
    Posted February 10, 2011 at 7:24 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for this post. You put into words thoughts I had but could not find a way to write down.

    While I do blog, I still consider myself a blog “consumer” most of the time. I read more than I write, basically. And I noticed myself over the last few years completely changing the roster of blogs that I read and admire. I no longer have an interest in some of the big names. Sure, I notice them in marketing campaigns but there is nothing influential there.

    I don’t look to this “elite” group for inspiration anymore because they have become so commercialized and removed from their readers. For example, Sea of Shoes took off the comments on her blog. That cinched it for me. While I still enjoy the photos for the esthetic appeal, I felt completely detached. In that instant, her blog was no different from a magazine or a commercial fashion website to me.

    I also feel cheated when I read a glowing review about a product from a blogger only to realize they were gifted that item. I understand the business to be made there but it really diminishes the legitimacy of future product reviews from that blogger.

  • Posted February 20, 2011 at 9:06 pm | Permalink

    This is a great article on something I (and clearly TONS of other people) were thinking about. Really great points made – love it!

  • Posted February 26, 2011 at 11:32 pm | Permalink

    WOW I thought I was the only one having these thoughts. When I see all these “style bloggers” get deals I’m thinking, they all look strikingly alike. Their “fashions” are similar and with the exception of Bryan Boy, Tavi and Susie they all pretty much fit the “model” standard of the things we see in Vogue magazine. So as bloggers, I don’t think we’re really progressing, there’s a select few that are getting attention when there are dozens who deserve it.

    I don’t feel like because I would like to be successful in the blogosphere I have to stand awkwardly in a mirror with my clothes that nobody gives a crap about. I will continue to blog my way without being a narcissist.

  • Posted March 11, 2011 at 6:36 pm | Permalink

    Interesting article — I tend to agree, but I also think the idea of blogging and influential bloggers are still something companies are still trying to grapple with. I don’t think they’re are technically fully aware of ‘what to do with’ it since (to them) it’s a nascent phenomenon. So clearly, they’re having trouble incorporating them appropriately as an extension of their brand instead of just sticking any well-known blogger in a campaign and hoping it will drive their sales. They seem pretty clueless, but I still think it’s great that they’re at least starting to open up to bloggers more as a legitimate force to drive their products. Baby steps.

  • Posted March 14, 2011 at 3:15 am | Permalink

    Love this post, and the fantastic replies too! I’m not familiar with Susie, so I can’t speak on that with real authority, I can only say that brands and bloggers at the end of the day are people. Clients have to feel comfortable with the blogger they collaborate with, they had a good relationship and collaborated, win or lose, I’d rather see big brands working with a blogger than not working with one! And lets face we all need to eat, pay bills and handle our respective bottom lines!

    As a Latina, I am incredibly tired of the ‘same’ faces over and over again and having none of them look like me! Especially since Latina Women, especially those raised back home, are raised by women who set the bar high, we are in many ways ‘expected’ to be fashionable, even in our day to day lives!

    I also get tired of campaigns that are exactly the same everywhere.

    of seeing blogs that are all pictures in a different outfit per day and calling that fashion blogging…I agree with the fact that content is still important and yes apparently there is quite a bit of burnout going around.

    Campaigns do have to evolve so that bloggers and their readers don’t burn out!

    ˙·٠•●♥ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ ♥●•●•
    Tracy @ Ascending Butterfly
    http://www.ascendingbutterfly.com

  • Posted March 14, 2011 at 3:15 am | Permalink

    Love this post, and the fantastic replies too! I’m not familiar with Susie, so I can’t speak on that with real authority, I can only say that brands and bloggers at the end of the day are people. Clients have to feel comfortable with the blogger they collaborate with, they had a good relationship and collaborated, win or lose, I’d rather see big brands working with a blogger than not working with one! And lets face we all need to eat, pay bills and handle our respective bottom lines!

    As a Latina, I am incredibly tired of the ‘same’ faces over and over again and having none of them look like me! Especially since Latina Women, especially those raised back home, are raised by women who set the bar high, we are in many ways ‘expected’ to be fashionable, even in our day to day lives!

    I also get tired of campaigns that are exactly the same everywhere.

    of seeing blogs that are all pictures in a different outfit per day and calling that fashion blogging…I agree with the fact that content is still important and yes apparently there is quite a bit of burnout going around.

    Campaigns do have to evolve so that bloggers and their readers don’t burn out!

    ˙·٠•●♥ Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ ♥●•●•
    Tracy @ Ascending Butterfly
    http://www.ascendingbutterfly.com

  • Kim
    Posted March 27, 2011 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    “I want fashion bloggers to be able to make a career out consulting or writing and contributing their creativity”

    But why? There are some of us out there who spent money and time going to school and actually honing real business skills as well as our eye for fashion and creativity. Yet, these days, any rich kid who wears a size 2 and has a camera is suddenly entitled to a “career”?

  • Kim
    Posted March 27, 2011 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    “I want fashion bloggers to be able to make a career out consulting or writing and contributing their creativity”

    But why? There are some of us out there who spent money and time going to school and actually honing real business skills as well as our eye for fashion and creativity. Yet, these days, any rich kid who wears a size 2 and has a camera is suddenly entitled to a “career”?

  • Kim
    Posted March 27, 2011 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    “I want fashion bloggers to be able to make a career out consulting or writing and contributing their creativity”

    But why? There are some of us out there who spent money and time going to school and actually honing real business skills as well as our eye for fashion and creativity. Yet, these days, any rich kid who wears a size 2 and has a camera is suddenly entitled to a “career”?

  • Posted April 27, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    Interesting angle for this blog post. Also makes one question the reliability of bloggers’ view on products if they are representing or working with specific brands as well.

  • Posted April 27, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    Interesting angle for this blog post. Also makes one question the reliability of bloggers’ view on products if they are representing or working with specific brands as well.

  • Posted April 27, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    Interesting angle for this blog post. Also makes one question the reliability of bloggers’ view on products if they are representing or working with specific brands as well.

  • Posted April 27, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    Interesting angle for this blog post. Also makes one question the reliability of bloggers’ view on products if they are representing or working with specific brands as well.

  • Posted May 5, 2011 at 2:15 pm | Permalink

    Awesome summer collection dude. Color combination and style both are too good. Like them :)

  • A W
    Posted May 6, 2011 at 2:13 pm | Permalink

    I have just come across this website and post – certainly makes for interesting reading along with the comments that have been raised around fashion PR and blogging. We have spoken to a number of PR agencies but blogging has never really been high on the agenda, certainly in the UK. Very interested in keeping tabs on how this topic unfolds as things here are different.

    Many thanks for the post and comments!

  • Posted May 27, 2011 at 1:59 am | Permalink

    Excellent post! Some really great insight

  • Anonymous
    Posted June 2, 2011 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    We just started our fashion site and do our own photo shoots (me and our friends model) and write commentary that we think is fun and try to create a creative theme for each one.  We don’t re-post magazine editorials, we make it ourselves.  We go above and beyond the quick street snap and dedicate ourselves to help promote our local designers.  We are not teenagers and we are not models and I hope we’re refreshing!

  • Anonymous
    Posted August 12, 2011 at 8:58 pm | Permalink

    I agree with everything you said. But the problem extends far past the niche of fashion bloggers. It seems in all blogging categories, brands work with the same handful of people. The same in-crowd gets all the new writing gigs. And there’s SO MUCH talent out there. It’s very frustrating. 

  • Posted August 23, 2011 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

    I totally love this article because you’ve touched on many things that I’ve been thinking in regards to this fashion blogger over-kill issue……whereby the same fashion bloggers are captured all the time!! It’s about time brands released that by continuously doing this (using the same bloggers), its putting other people off who feel they have a voice but are never actually heard!

  • Posted September 23, 2011 at 6:10 am | Permalink
  • Posted October 8, 2011 at 6:43 pm | Permalink

    nicely written.  I totally agree that we need to reach out and expand the current set of “influential bloggers.” 

    http://www.FabGabBlog.com

  • Posted October 25, 2011 at 3:23 am | Permalink

    all i can say is amen woman, amen! be real, be truthful to others, be truthful to you! 

  • Posted October 25, 2011 at 3:23 am | Permalink

    all i can say is amen woman, amen! be real, be truthful to others, be truthful to you! 

  • Aileenw89
    Posted October 27, 2011 at 7:03 am | Permalink

    As an Asian female, I DEFINITELY don’t see faces (or bodies) like Susie Bubble’s in mainstream fashion media.  I am ECSTATIC that someone so “ordinary” who would be normally overlooked in the “real world” could be recognized for her creativity in such a way.  Instead of slapping the average celebrity face onto ads, I’m impressed that the fashion industry is looking towards bloggers.  It’s like the whole “youtube celebrity” phenomenon.  It’s exciting that any of us can start a blog, take some pictures, and share our thoughts with the possibility of striking a larger audience.  I am all for fashion PR taking in bloggers.  I’m thrilled that the exclusive world of fashion is FINALLY opening up a little to “everyone.”

  • Posted October 30, 2011 at 4:45 am | Permalink

    Great article, glad I stumbled upon this website. There in fact needs to be more diversity for sure. Such a valid point.

  • KCruz
    Posted November 2, 2011 at 8:19 am | Permalink

    Extremely inspiring post! I just came across this article today, and appreciated the acknowledgement of lack of diversity within Fashion PR bloggers. I completely agree with your stance on the modelesque  bloggers posing as “real” women leaving the average woman to be continuously marginalized because of her lack of fitting the mold. No doubt, diversity needs to be seen amongst mainstream Fashion bloggers instead of tracking minority/underrepresented bloggers towards their area of “expertise”. Thank you for posting your thoughts on this subject…and bringing this ongoing issue to light!

  • Anna Reilly
    Posted November 2, 2011 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

    What a great post! I have to say that I myself have thought these same things.The reason why I look at fashion blogs is to be inspired by outfit creations and mixing and matching of different brands. I feel as though bloggers who take endorsements or start promoting other brands due to a sponsorship they start to loose credibility in the eyes of their readers. If I wanted to see an outfit you created using all one brand that paid you and provided the clothes, I would just look on that companies website. 

  • Anna Reilly
    Posted November 2, 2011 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

    What a great post! I have to say that I myself have thought these same things.The reason why I look at fashion blogs is to be inspired by outfit creations and mixing and matching of different brands. I feel as though bloggers who take endorsements or start promoting other brands due to a sponsorship they start to loose credibility in the eyes of their readers. If I wanted to see an outfit you created using all one brand that paid you and provided the clothes, I would just look on that companies website. 

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  • Posted November 21, 2011 at 10:53 pm | Permalink

    All valid points! I have been desperately searching for a group of fashion blogs I can go to daily for relevant, diverse posts. I find that a lot of fashion blogs these days just feature pretty outfits with no other substance. Thanks for starting a discussion about this! 

  • Posted November 24, 2011 at 7:02 am | Permalink

    This is a good discussion and a good idea. I felt and experience it myself. 

  • Posted December 8, 2011 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    I have a WILD SUGGESTION, How About Live And Let Live. 

  • Posted November 30, 2012 at 5:17 am | Permalink

    Love this kind of posts because you end up knowing more people and find out great inspiration!Thanks!

  • Posted March 18, 2013 at 12:16 pm | Permalink

    God this article is so old, but I felt compelled to comment on it anyway. As a seasoned style expert, author and fashion blogger who has been in the fashion industry for 20 years now (first as a fashion designer before I started my fashion consulting company in 2002), lately I’ve felt that those out there who are being seen as experts in the fashion industry are people who have absolutely no credentials and no idea what they are doing. Why does the fashion industry always go for the pretty “low hanging fruit” and why do those who have a skill set have to compete with this?

    With all my experience, I am constantly trying to educate and enlighten my readers with information they can actually learn from. Perhaps this is just a case of sour grapes, but should I really have to compete with a 16 year old girl who posts a hauler video after a shopping spree at the mall? And why are celebrities like Kim Kardashian, Jessican Simpson and Kelly Osbourne seen as fashion experts and gurus while people who do actually have knowledge and experience sit by the wayside? It makes no sense. However, I also realize that this seems to be what the general public wants. To me, it’s just a bit sad and, I’ll admit, very frustrating.

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Meet Crosby Noricks

Hi. I'm Crosby, the founder of PR Couture and a fashion brand strategist. I care about supporting and celebrating fashion publicists as well as helping rad companies connect with their audiences in more meaningful ways. Recently, iMedia included me in their annual list of 25 Internet Marketing Leaders and Innovators, along with people from Starbucks, Twitter and Volkswagon, which I think is pretty neat. Like Elle Woods, I am a Gemini-vegetarian (that's about where the similarities end). Let's connect: Check out my full bio, Brand Elixer sessions or shoot me an electronic communiqué.